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FAQs

Committed to promoting the physical health and wellness of all students at The Claremont College.

How do I make an appointment to see a doctor or nurse practitioner?

You can schedule an appointment online through My Health Portal. Alternatively, you can call (909) 621-8222 to speak with a medical receptionist who will assist you. You may also schedule an appointment in person at Student Health Services.

May I request a specific doctor, nurse practitioner or appointment time?

The medical receptionists attempt to schedule the first available appointment that works with your schedule. You may request any provider or specific day and time, with the understanding that this may result in a longer waiting time for the appointment.

What happens if I have to schedule my appointment during class time?

You may request a verification letter signed by a Student Health Service provider stating the date and time of your appointment. You should request this letter from the medical provider during your appointment. If you need a verification letter at any other time, you must come in to the office to make the request. The receptionists will do their best to get the letter to you as soon as possible.

When the medical receptionist asks why I want to see the medical provider, can I still make an appointment if I do not want to disclose that information?

Although it is helpful for the receptionist making the appointment to know why you wish to see a provider, you can tell the receptionist that it is a “personal matter.” Please be advised that in some instances, if the provider is not given complete information, a follow-up appointment may need to be scheduled.

What does it cost to see the doctor or nurse practitioner?

There is no charge for a scheduled appointment to see the doctor or nurse practitioner. However, depending upon your treatment you may be billed for services rendered at the time of your appointment. The following services may result in additional charges: physical examinations, X-rays, lab tests, prescription medicine and other medical procedures. Your provider will discuss your treatment with you explaining the need and cost of additional services. As a patient, you may decline any services. If you do not have a scheduled appointment there will be a non-scheduled visit charge of $15. You will be seen by the nursing staff who will triage and determine if this is an urgent matter. Non-urgent matters will be offered a future appointment or referred to a local urgent care center.

Are you open for after-hours appointments?

Student Health Services is open until 7 p.m. every Wednesday during the fall and spring terms. Students can schedule an appointment to see the doctor or nurse practitioner during this time. The laboratory and dispensary are also open during this time, but please be advised that X-rays are not available to patients during evening hours.

Can I get a hold of my doctor when the office is closed?

The Student Health Services on-call provider can be contacted by calling Campus Safety at (909) 607-2000 or on-campus extension x72000. The dispatcher will page the on-call medical provider and he/she will return your call. On-call services are available Monday through Friday 5 p.m. until 8 a.m. and 24 hours a day over weekends. Although you may not speak with your primary medical provider directly, the on-call provider may offer advice over the telephone.

What if I do not want my parents to find out I saw a doctor?

All medical services provided students by Student Health Services are strictly confidential. The only way a parent or any other individual may have access to private medical information is by written consent signed by the patient, naming the specific person(s) and any medical information that is to be released. Release of information form

May I have a copy of my medical records?

All students may request a copy of their medical records. This release of information form or a written request must be submitted. This request should include: the name of the school the student is attending/attended, year of graduation, list of information requested, the manner of delivery (mailed or picked-up by patient), and must be dated and signed by the patient. The records will then be copied and delivered according to the patient’s request. A small fee for copying may be charged.

What if Student Health Services is closed and I need my information?

Student Health Services is closed during the winter and summer breaks. However, you may still submit a written request for medical records. This release of information form or a written request must be submitted. This request should include: the name of the school the student is attending/attended, year of graduation, list of information requested, the manner of delivery (mailed or picked-up by patient) and must be dated and signed by the patient. The records will then be copied and delivered according to the patient’s request. A small fee for copying may be charged. Please allow two weeks for delivery of the records.

Can I get birth control at Student Health Services?

Student Health Services offers many women’s health services. Birth control may be provided to patients after a brief appointment with a provider. During your appointment, the provider will discuss your needs and options available. A physical examination is not required at the time of your request, but your provider will discuss the need for any future appointments with you. You may request a female provider at the time of making an appointment for any women’s health needs.

Student Health Services also offers the following services: pregnancy testing, PAP screening, confidential STI testing, lab work, breast examinations and consultations for personal and private matters. Please see the women’s health page for more details.

What if I do not like the medical provider I saw at SHS, but I need to come back?

You can schedule an appointment with any provider. If you have been given a recommendation for a provider or would like to see a different provider than you’ve seen in the past, simply make the request at the time you make your appointment. There is no requirement to provide a reason for the change.

How long do I have to wait if I walk-in to see a medical provider?

Student Health Services cannot give a guarantee of a minimum or maximum wait time for non-scheduled visits. Patients will be seen by the nursing staff that will triage and determine if this is an “urgent” matter. Non-urgent matters will be offered a future appointment and will be provided with self-care instructions, or will be referred to a local urgent care center.

What if I cannot pay the charges for service after seeing the medical provider?

As a patient, you have the right to decline services for lab or X-ray before they are ordered by the health care provider. At the time of check-out, the medical receptionist will explain all charges to you. You have 30 days from the date of your appointment to make payment(s) on your account. You may make payments by check, cash, Claremont Cash or credit card (Visa/MasterCard). If your bill has not been paid after 30 days, the bill will be sent to your college and the college then will request payment according to their campus policies.

My roommate has Mono, how do I know if I have it and what do I do?

“Mono” is short for infectious mononucleosis, an illness caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It is characterized initially by mild headache, tiredness and decreased appetite followed by sore throat, fatigue, swollen glands, fever, muscle aches and sometimes a swollen liver or spleen. Not all people with mono have all of the symptoms and the severity can vary. The symptoms usually last one to four weeks but some people may have lingering fatigue. Mono is a self-limited illness, which means that it resolves itself. There is no medicine that will cure the infection. Patients should rest, drink lots of fluids, use throat lozenges and take acetaminophen (Tylenol) 650 milligrams every four to six hours as needed. Rarely, steroid medications are used to shrink severely swollen tonsils. There are no specific restrictions on non-athletic activities but patients should rest as much as necessary. Do not drink alcohol. After the symptoms are gone, normal activities may be resumed. More information: Mononucleosis

I think I have lice, what do I do?

Lice are tiny insects that live on humans and survive by feeding on blood. When a large number of lice live and reproduce on a person, it is called an infestation. Lice are spread easily from one person to another through close bodily contact or through shared clothing or personal items (such as hats or hair brushes). They cannot jump or fly. Lice will not go away without proper treatment. In the meantime, they can be spread to other household members, sexual partners or other people you may come into close personal contact with. If you think you have lice, try a nonprescription product or call a health professional. More information: Lice

I think I have the stomach flu, what do I do?

Gastroenteritis (stomach flu) is an illness characterized by nausea, vomiting, fever, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. It is most commonly caused by viruses and usually no tests are necessary. More information: Gastroenteritis

What should I do if I have a Cold or Seasonal Influenza?

Persons with influenza have some or all of these symptoms: fever, cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, chills, fatigue, diarrhea and vomiting. These symptoms may last one to two weeks. If you have been diagnosed with influenza, or strongly suspect that you have it, you should follow these recommendations:

    • Get plenty of rest.

    • Drink extra fluids. Warm fluids like tea with honey/lemon and soup may be soothing.

    • Gargle with a salt water solution, mouthwash, or use a throat spray if helpful.

    • Take acetaminophen (Tylenol), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve) to reduce fever and lessen headache and body ache.

    • Use decongestants (Sudafed), antihistamines (loratadine, diphenhydramine) and cough suppressants (dextromethorphan-DM) as directed to reduce symptoms.

    • Take a steamy shower or use a humidifier to relieve nasal congestion.

More information: Cold or Seasonal Influenza

Will Student Health Services bill my insurance directly?

Student Health Services does not provide any health insurance policy. Students may purchase student health insurance through your college. Many students carry health insurance provided by their parent or guardian. Student Health Services does not directly bill any insurance company. A receipt is provided that can be submitted to an insurance carrier for reimbursement. Students are responsible for payment of all clinic charges at the time of service, or may make payments directly to Student Health Services within 30 days. After 30 days, the charge(s) is transferred to student accounts at your college. For information regarding the Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan, please contact your dean of students office.

What should I do if I or a friend experiences a sexual assault?

People who have experienced a sexual assault have experienced a profound violation. Their sense of safety and predictability has been shattered. Survivors’ reactions may vary profoundly depending on their life circumstances and amount of social support. Student Health and Counseling Services is available to provide support, resources and assistance to students who have experienced a sexual assault. For more information, please see:

How can I get medical advice?

The Student Health Services for The Claremont Colleges, has a nurse advice phone service. Students can call the office during office hours and speak with a registered nurse for advice or to determine if the student needs to be seen by a medical provider that day or for a future appointment.

If the nurse is unable to answer the phone, students may leave a message and the advice nurse will return the call between 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Students can get self-care help and instructions for conditions, including upset stomach, cold symptoms, fever, sore throat and rash. The nurses can also answer questions about birth control or sexually transmitted infection concerns. Patients may be directed to see a medical provider at the Student Health Services or be advised to go to the local urgent care center or emergency room if needed. On-call services are available after office hours through campus safety at (909) 607-2000.

What should I do if I suspect I or a friend has an eating disorder?

The Eating Disorder Task Force is a collaborative effort by Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services (MCAPS), Student Health Services and Health Education Outreach (HEO) to provide resources and direct services to students struggling with eating disorders. The Eating Disorder Task Force aims to support students with direct services and provide appropriate referrals to enhance their psychological well-being and physical health and provide education consultation, awareness and outreach services to students, faculty and staff at The Claremont Colleges.